Lanced Hearts of Lovers & Martyrs

I'm Eric, a young poet who seems to have been swept away in the Romantic Spirit of Beethoven's Symphonies, struck by the philosophies of Plato & the Poets' lyrics, burned for love like the martyrs of Rome, and can see an honest beauty in love & faith.

This blog is dedicated to my passions in Poetry, Literature, History, Philosophy, and Music, along with exploring the beauty and truth in the Christian faith-- how it rebels and transcends the ways of the world and burns it ablaze; preaches it's the Heart that counts, sings how Love endures, and that Truth is a beautiful Bride & hypocrisy a sin. It reveals that love is self-less, death is no end, and that there's no greater love than to lay down your life for your friends.

• Faith & Philosophy
• History (esp. 19th cen.-WWI)
• Poetry & Literature
• Catholicism

• Christ
• St. Justin Martyr
• Socrates
• Victor Hugo
• J.R.R. Tolkien
• Richard Wagner

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"Reason directs those who are truly pious and philosophical to honour and love only what is true, declining to follow traditional opinions, if these be worthless."
-St. Justin Martyr

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  1. Pacem, Dei Munus Pulcherrimum

    White smoke rises as the world burns.
    & up from the ashes of the Suicide of our century’s World,
    a phoenix to our souls cries “Peace” against the War.
    But not a sound breaks the thunder or the shells,
    Or the deaf-tone cheers of olden hearts,
    set for glory no further than our external shore.

    Tribute to Benedict XV, Vicar elct. 1914.

     
     
  2. Joan of Arc statue at Reims Cathedral
MAY 30th, 1431— THE BURNING OF ST. JOAN

JOAN:      See you the rainbow yonder in the air?Its golden portals heaven doth wide unfold,Amid the angel choir she radiant stands,The eternal Son she claspeth to her breast,Her arms she stretcheth forth to me in love.How is it with me? Light clouds bear me up—My ponderous mail becomes a winged robe;I mount—I fly—back rolls the dwindling earth—Brief is the sorrow—endless is the joy!

—The Maid of Orleans, Friedrich Shiller

    Joan of Arc statue at Reims Cathedral

    MAY 30th, 1431— THE BURNING OF ST. JOAN

    JOAN:      See you the rainbow yonder in the air?
    Its golden portals heaven doth wide unfold,
    Amid the angel choir she radiant stands,
    The eternal Son she claspeth to her breast,
    Her arms she stretcheth forth to me in love.
    How is it with me? Light clouds bear me up—
    My ponderous mail becomes a winged robe;
    I mount—I fly—back rolls the dwindling earth—
    Brief is the sorrow—endless is the joy!

    —The Maid of Orleans, Friedrich Shiller


     
     
  3. A Soul & City Under Siege— Augustine’s look on Evil

    When I was a child, I used to think as a child. I thought of true evil as a cartoon villain who couldn’t love, trying to destroy the world merely to destroy it: That Evil must be in direct opposite of Good; destroying for the sake of destroying; killing for the sake of killing. That to destroy with strewed intentions of doing good has a shred of innocence, and is not truly evil.  

    It was St. Augustine, though, that once said that evil is really a ‘disordered love’; That it’s not so much the opposite of Good, but the corruption of it. Like Cancer cells to healthy cells of our souls, evil is the Good in our lives twisted to wrong meastures.— When God created the world, he called it good; When he created Man, he called it very good.— The true human nature is good, perfect; but evil is the corruption of our nature, like a lie is the corruption of Truth, or cancer is the corruption of the body.

    One of the most maturing thoughts I ever had was realizing the Tyrant that kills millions doesn’t actually say in his heart "I’m evil and I enjoy it," but honestly "I’m making the world a better place." For even Hitler thought he was acting 'for the good of all humanity.'

    Augustine illustrated the battle of Good Vs. Evil not as two opposite forces ever-warring with equal arms over the fate of the World, but as this: It is that of two cities together; ‘The Eternal City’, the City of God, that stands for Good. But the other— it is not the City of Hell, or Sin but the ‘City of the World’, that along with God, stand’s for the Good, but is under siege, and occupied territory by what is Evil, like a cancer invading our body. And all of God’s and man’s struggle together is to reunite these two cities, and restore everything back to the Good.

     
     
  4. "Courage is almost a contradiction in terms. It means a strong desire to live taking the form of a readiness to die."
    — G. K. Chesterton (via thefullnessofthefaith)

    (Source: lovemishie)

     
     
  5. The Most Beautiful Passage I’ve Taken From The Catechism

    677 The Church will enter the glory of the kingdom only through this final Passover, when she will follow her Lord in his death and Resurrection.579The kingdom will be fulfilled, then, not by a historic triumph of the Church through a progressive ascendancy, but only by God’s victory over the final unleashing of evil, which will cause his Bride to come down from heaven.580 God’s triumph over the revolt of evil will take the form of the Last Judgment after the final cosmic upheaval of this passing world.581

     
     
  6. "The truth of our salvation is when you said that we have recovered our strength, not of sin anymore and to fear the worse that should befall us."
    — 

     

    St. Augustine

    (Confessions 4,3)

     
     
  7. Ash Wedsnesday, for me even before I accepted Christianity, was always something I couldn’t help but admire. There was just something I found poetic about it all. As a non-Christian, it was that one Tradition I could respect. The whole idea of spreading ashes into the same symbol that their God died on, as to symbolize their own death to the world— and then to have that, these ashes of death, be their bold proclamation to the world that they are Christians when they carry out their day. To blend those messages and dualize the symbol together; I’m dead, and I’m a Christian— as if this death was what being a Christian is all about— I just thought that was too poetic. Made me always thing of the ‘heretics’ like Joan of Arc or Jon Hus burned at the stake, for whom, even the pain of death wasn’t enough to abandon what they loved and believed. Pure poetry.
But there’s always something poetic about ashes and death. It was when I started personally persuing Christ, this got to be more than poetic appeal, but real. Like Emily Dickens’ I Died for Beauty chants how the Beautiful and Truthful are one an the same, this beauty to me became a Truth I could see.
And I saw those ashes were more than just death. It’s about new life. It’s like Baptism, ‘sharing in the death and resurrection’ of Christ. This resurrection that we hope for in these 40 days— a hope similar to those souls in the Flood— is more than just Christs’, it’s our own Resurrection from the death we followed him to. Out of our charred and suffering (it’s sure painful being burned alive) bodies of repentance, we get to embrace a new life, like making ‘Beauty from ashes’ as Isaiah said it. When the Father says the words "For dust Men are and to dust you shall return"—Yes, as men we are mortal, but as children of God and brothers in Christ, we are heirs to an immortal glory. 
It’s Beautiful.

    Ash Wedsnesday, for me even before I accepted Christianity, was always something I couldn’t help but admire. There was just something I found poetic about it all. As a non-Christian, it was that one Tradition I could respect. The whole idea of spreading ashes into the same symbol that their God died on, as to symbolize their own death to the world— and then to have that, these ashes of death, be their bold proclamation to the world that they are Christians when they carry out their day. To blend those messages and dualize the symbol together; I’m dead, and I’m a Christian— as if this death was what being a Christian is all about— I just thought that was too poetic. Made me always thing of the ‘heretics’ like Joan of Arc or Jon Hus burned at the stake, for whom, even the pain of death wasn’t enough to abandon what they loved and believed. Pure poetry.

    But there’s always something poetic about ashes and death. It was when I started personally persuing Christ, this got to be more than poetic appeal, but real. Like Emily Dickens’ I Died for Beauty chants how the Beautiful and Truthful are one an the same, this beauty to me became a Truth I could see.

    And I saw those ashes were more than just death. It’s about new life. It’s like Baptism, ‘sharing in the death and resurrection’ of Christ. This resurrection that we hope for in these 40 days— a hope similar to those souls in the Flood— is more than just Christs’, it’s our own Resurrection from the death we followed him to. Out of our charred and suffering (it’s sure painful being burned alive) bodies of repentance, we get to embrace a new life, like making ‘Beauty from ashes’ as Isaiah said it. When the Father says the words "For dust Men are and to dust you shall return"—Yes, as men we are mortal, but as children of God and brothers in Christ, we are heirs to an immortal glory. 

    It’s Beautiful.